This Color Test Will Predict Your 2017 Future

Is it pleasant pink or tumultuous teal?

Astronauts On The Space Station Did The Mannequin Challenge So Everyone Can Stop Now

Space: where no mannequin has gone before.

And the cast of Saturday Night Live.

And the cast of Saturday Night Live.

These pets.

These pets.

Blac Chyna in the delivery room.

Blac Chyna in the delivery room.


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The 47 Most WTF Celebrity Moments Of 2016

If you thought 2016 was pretty WTF anyway, wait until you look back at this.

Taylor Swift started dating Tom Hiddleston straight after splitting from Calvin Harris, which was pretty WTF anyway. But then things moved insanely quickly. Here they are meeting Tom's mother after just NINE DAYS of dating.

Taylor Swift started dating Tom Hiddleston straight after splitting from Calvin Harris, which was pretty WTF anyway. But then things moved insanely quickly. Here they are meeting Tom's mother after just NINE DAYS of dating.

Goff Photos / / /FameFlynet.uk.com

Then just over TWO WEEKS after they started going out, Tom declared his love for Taylor on a T-shirt for the world to see.

Then just over TWO WEEKS after they started going out, Tom declared his love for Taylor on a T-shirt for the world to see.

Ryan Turgeon / Ryan Turgeon / Splash News

Ryan Turgeon / Splash News


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Celebrity Babies We Met In 2016

At least 2016 gave us these adorable little faces.

Luna Simone

Chrissy Teigen and John Legend's adorable child.

Instagram: @chrissyteigen

Boomer Phelps

Michael Phelps' little man with his wife Nicole Johnson.

Instagram: @m_phelps00

Remington Alexander

Smiley little child to Kelly Clarkson and Brandon Blackstock.

Instagram: @kellyclarkson

Dream Kardashian

Spawn of Blac Chyna and Rob Kardashian.

Instagram: @dream


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10 Celebs Killin’ The Elf On The Shelf Game

These celebs are taking it to a new level.

Sarah Michelle Gellar, whose elves spent time in the workshop...

Instagram: @sarahmgellar

...and dressed in knitted mermaid tails.

Instagram: @sarahmgellar

Busy Phillips, who has notoriously ruled the game for the past few years...

Instagram: @busyphilipps

...Who also created an Elf on the Shelf red carpet premiere for Rogue One.

Instagram: @busyphilipps


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Endangered Snow Leopard Quadruplets Were Caught On Camera For The First Time

The remote video footage in Mongolia of the endangered snow leopard family is the first of its kind, the World Wildlife Fund announced.

Snow leopard quadruplets have been caught on film in the wild for the first time, a surprise find for researchers tracking the endangered species.

Snow leopard quadruplets have been caught on film in the wild for the first time, a surprise find for researchers tracking the endangered species.

WWF / Via worldwildlife.org

There are only between 4,080 and 6,590 snow leopards left in the wild, according to the World Wildlife Foundation, which announced the footage Wednesday. And their numbers are falling.

Found in 12 countries, including China, Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Russia, and Mongolia, the leopards have evolved to live in some of the harshest environments on earth, but have fallen victim to habitat loss and so-called "revenge" hunting by farmers whose livestock can quickly become prey.

The footage of an adult snow leopard with her four cubs was recorded in Mongolia, the WFF said.

Three six-week-old snow leopard cubs are held by zookeepers in Hungary.

Zoltan Gergely Kelemen / AP

While litters of up to three cubs have been observed before, the quadruplets are a first, according to the WFF.

Fun fact: The snow leopard can leap six times the length of its body.


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A Couple Was Sent Hundreds Of Letters Meant For Santa, So They Decided To Answer Them

Make way for small miracles.

Meet Jim Glaub and Dylan Parker.

Meet Jim Glaub and Dylan Parker.

John Heil

Several years ago, the couple lived together on 22nd Street in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood. Their address was special. Really, really special...

Several years ago, the couple lived together on 22nd Street in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood. Their address was special. Really, really special...

Google

...because it's the home of Santa Claus!

...because it's the home of Santa Claus!

CW

Okay, not really, but for some reason, a bunch of kids started mailing their letters to da Claus to Dylan and Jim's address.

Okay, not really, but for some reason, a bunch of kids started mailing their letters to da Claus to Dylan and Jim's address.

At first, Jim told BuzzFeed, they'd receive only a few letters each year. But then, "we started to receive these letters by the dozens! Every day a new batch of 25 to 30 letters would appear in our mailbox. It was so strange." Neither is really sure how or why, but apparently the address has been receiving mail for Santa for more than a decade.

giphy.com


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This Guy Found A Hack To Stop His iPhone AirPods From Falling Out

Through his stretched earlobe piercing.

In September Apple introduced AirPods – a pair of wireless earbuds.

In September Apple introduced AirPods – a pair of wireless earbuds.

Nicole Nguyen / BuzzFeed / Via buzzfeed.com

He's not the only person to come up with creative solutions to the AirPod conundrum. Designer Each Jewels invented earrings that AirPods can be clipped into.

He's not the only person to come up with creative solutions to the AirPod conundrum. Designer Each Jewels invented earrings that AirPods can be clipped into.

eachjewels / Via eachjewels.com


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This Russian Fisherman’s Deep-Sea Discoveries Are The Stuff Of Nightmares

The ocean is terrifying and don’t you forget it.


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A Woman Was Captured Yelling A Tirade Of Racial Slurs At A Customer For Cutting In Line

Officials are trying to identify the woman in the Facebook video, that’s quickly gone viral, to ban her permanently from the Louisville mall.

On Tuesday, a video posted by Louisville, Kentucky resident, Renee Buckner, showed a woman standing in line at a store in the mall berating another customer for cutting the line. According to Buckner, the woman was set off after another woman added a few items to her friend's transaction instead of getting in line herself.

Buckner wrote on Facebook, "This Hispanic lady was purchasing items and the transaction was almost complete, then her friend brings up some shirts to be added to her purchase instead of getting in line."

She explained that this is what set the woman, seen in the blue-ish/gray sweater in the video, off.

BuzzFeed News has reached out to Buckner to learn more.

youtube.com

The video, taken in a JC Penney at the local Jefferson Mall, showed the woman quickly devolving into a tirade of racist remarks. "Go back to wherever the f*ck you came from," she's heard yelling.

The video, taken in a JC Penney at the local Jefferson Mall, showed the woman quickly devolving into a tirade of racist remarks. "Go back to wherever the f*ck you came from," she's heard yelling.

She then turns to the cashier, and asks him, "Tell them to go back to where they belong."

The woman is seen and heard shouting a slew of racially-charged statements at the customers at the register, including making an assumption they're on welfare.

"Prey[ing] on welfare," she said. "The taxpayers probably paid for all that stuff."

Facebook: renee.buckner.3

Jefferson Mall has released a statement to NBC-affiliate WAVE 3 News that they're currently looking to identify the woman in the video, "and once identified, she will be permanently banned" from the mall.

Jefferson Mall has released a statement to NBC-affiliate WAVE 3 News that they're currently looking to identify the woman in the video, "and once identified, she will be permanently banned" from the mall.

"We are aware of the video posted online today from inside JCPenney," officials wrote. "Jefferson Mall strives to create a comfortable and convenient experience for all of our guests and we absolutely do not condone this type of behavior."

Facebook: renee.buckner.3


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An Adorable 2-Year-Old Totally Won Over This Entire Hockey Arena

“Can they do this at every game?”

His father, Tony Becker, told BuzzFeed News that the outpouring of support for Mason happened suddenly.

"It grew and grew and grew. It went from just our little section, to the whole stadium. It was very quick," he said.


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The 18 Best Nonfiction Books Of 2016

These are the essay collections, memoirs, and nonfiction reads that we absolutely loved in 2016. (Ranked in no particular order.)

BuzzFeed News


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20 Movies To Binge Watch

Don’t know what to watch? Here’s some help!

The Martian

The Martian

Starring: Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Kristin Wiig, Kate Mara
Director: Ridley Scott

DIY greenhouse? Check.

filmlinc / Via giphy.com

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings

Starring: Elijah Wood, Ian McKellan, Viggo Mortensen, Orlando Bloom
Director: Peter Jackson

Even if you do not like fantasy films, the film score is amazing.

teendotcom.tumblr.com / Via giphy.com

Starring: George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle, Bernie Mac, Scott Caan, Casey Affleck, Carl Reiner, Elliott Gould, Eddie Jemison, Julia Roberts, Shaobo Qin
Director: Steven Soderbergh

Look at the cast. Again.

Starring: Tyler Perry, Denise Richards, Eugene Levy, Danielle Campbell, Romeo Miller, Doris Roberts, Tom Arnold
Director: Tyler Perry

Everyone needs a small dose of Madea in their lives.


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A Mom Gave Her Daughter A Hilariously Stern Talking-To After She Got Cropped Out Of A Photo

“I gave birth to you with such difficulty and you repay me by cropping me out.”

This is 18-year-old Abeera Tariq with her mom, Noreen. Their entire family attended her cousin's wedding recently, and this specific photo was apparently among hundreds of photos taken that day.

This is 18-year-old Abeera Tariq with her mom, Noreen. Their entire family attended her cousin's wedding recently, and this specific photo was apparently among hundreds of photos taken that day.

Abeera Tariq

Upset, Noreen screenshotted the photo and asked her daughter why she was cropped out of it. "[You] all are here in this world because of me," she proceeded to say as she addressed the indignity.

Upset, Noreen screenshotted the photo and asked her daughter why she was cropped out of it. "[You] all are here in this world because of me," she proceeded to say as she addressed the indignity.

Momma Noreen then texted in Urdu and said (loosely translated to English), "Ungrateful kids...I gave birth to you with such difficulty and you repay me by cropping me out."

Tariq said she and her mom "joke around like that all the time," but she genuinely "felt bad" when she got saw the texts.

But her mom ended up calling her, and they were able to laugh about it all after.

Abeera Tariq


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These Beautifully Haunting Photos Illustrate How Much We're Polluting The Ocean

Save the mermaids! #MermaidsHatePlastic

This picture, taken by photographer Benjamin Von Wong, features a beached mermaid laying on top of 10,000 recycled plastic bottles.

This picture, taken by photographer Benjamin Von Wong, features a beached mermaid laying on top of 10,000 recycled plastic bottles.

"If the average American uses 167 plastic bottles a year, in 60 years they will have used 10,000 plastic bottles," a statement on his website reads.

Vonwong / Via blog.vonwong.com

By using the recycled plastic bottles as a stand-in for the ocean, Von Wong hopes the images start a conversation on how plastic bottles are polluting our oceans.

By using the recycled plastic bottles as a stand-in for the ocean, Von Wong hopes the images start a conversation on how plastic bottles are polluting our oceans.

Vonwong / Via blog.vonwong.com

In addition to having a camera crew help him, Von Wong brought in a team of volunteers, a professional makeup artist, and an airbrusher.

In addition to having a camera crew help him, Von Wong brought in a team of volunteers, a professional makeup artist, and an airbrusher.

The silicone tails were made by Canadian designer Cynthia Cyntault of Cyntault Créations, who made them specifically for the project.

Mathieu Harvey and Paul Kepron / Via blog.vonwong.com

"Hopefully people feel empowered by this series," Von Wong told BuzzFeed.

"Hopefully people feel empowered by this series," Von Wong told BuzzFeed.

He wants people to remember "that we can make a difference and make sure there are 10,000 less bottles in the ocean, rather than get depressed and think, 'Oh, what difference will it make anyways.'"

Vonwong / Via blog.vonwong.com


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Klingon Newt, Ziggy Stardust Snake, Wooly-Headed Bat Among 163 New Species Discovered

Scientists this week announced the discovery of 163 new species, including a newt that resembles a Klingon from Star Trek and a rainbow-headed snake resembling David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust.

Here are some of the more eye-catching discoveries:

Rainbow-headed snake

Rainbow-headed snake

Parafimbrios lao, Laos

Alexander Teynie / Via via WWF

Researchers on a hike in northern Laos just happened upon the rainbow-headed snake, which they likened to David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust character, as it was perched on a mossy rock.

“It did not look like something known,” Alexander Teynie said in the World Wildlife Fund report. “We approached with shock, bringing to mind all known species in Asia that it may resemble, but there was no match!”

In fact the snake, with its distinct coloration, rows of scales, and unique number of upper teeth, wasn’t just a new species, it was part of a new Genus: Parafimbrios, scientists reported.

The "Klingon" Newt

The "Klingon" Newt

Tylototriton anguliceps, Thailand

Porrawee Pomchote / Via via WWF

The so-called Klingon newt, with its distinctive dorsal ridge and red markings, is only the fourth newt species found to exist in Thailand. Between 6 and 7 centimeters long, it was discovered in the Chiang Rai province.

Wooly-Headed Bat

Wooly-Headed Bat

Murina kontumensis, Vietnam

Nguyen Truong Son / Via via WWF

The medium-sized bat was found in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, adding to the diversity of a family of bats known for the thick, woolly fur on their heads and forearms, the WWF reported.

Phuket Horned Tree Agamid

Phuket Horned Tree Agamid

Acanthosaura phuketensis, Thailand

Montri Sumontha / Via via WWF

Discovered on the island of Phuket, the forest-dwelling lizard is distinguished from its mainland cousins by intimidating horns along its back and head. It was also a surprise find for scientists on an island that is relatively developed as a major tourist destination.

"The reptile fauna of Phuket has been ignored for many years by biologists because most of the forest cover of the island has been destroyed by human activities,” conservation biologist Olivier Pauwels said in the WWF report.

And despite its appearance, researchers say the lizard is totally harmless.

In all, scientists discovered 9 amphibians, 11 fish, 14 reptiles, 126 plants, and 3 mammals in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam.

In all, scientists discovered 9 amphibians, 11 fish, 14 reptiles, 126 plants, and 3 mammals in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Nobuyuki Tanaka / Via via WWF

The WWF warns that habitat loss and destruction, as well as pollution and other manmade intrusions, are putting pressure on Southeast Asia species, many of which depend on delicate, single environments.

Poaching and illegal wildlife trade for rare species are also taking their toll, scientists said in the report.

"These scientists, the unsung heroes of conservation, know they are racing against time to ensure that these newly discovered species are protected," said Jimmy Borah, wildlife program manager for WWF-Greater Mekong.

To read the full WWF report, Species Oddity, go here.

LINK: The World’s Oldest Known Breeding Seabird Just Laid Another Egg

LINK: Giraffes At Risk Of “Silent Extinction” After Population Plunges By 40%


Germans Came Up With An Adorable Way To Fight Fake News After The Berlin Truck Attack

Introducing your new favorite hashtag: #KatzenStattSpekulationen, or #CatsNotSpeculation.


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"La La Land" And The Privilege Of Nostalgia

Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) at the movies in La La Land.

Dale Robinette / Lionsgate

Nostalgia is more than an emotion for the pair of lovers in La La Land. It’s a belief system, the scaffolding supporting their fragile yearnings for showbiz success, propping them up against an onslaught of present-day indignities. Mia (Emma Stone), an aspiring actor, and Sebastian (Ryan Gosling), a struggling jazz pianist, sleep under posters of Ingrid Bergman and collect piano stools that once allegedly propped up Hoagy Carmichael's legendary behind, as if these objects have totemic value. They dream in Technicolor, or in glimmering black and white.

Both have their own sacred spaces tucked away in not-always-pretty present-day Los Angeles. There’s the window from Casablanca on the Warner Bros. lot where Mia works, between auditions, as a barista, and there's the treasured music venue that's transformed into a combination samba/tapas joint, enraging Sebastian (“Pick one,” he fumes). Their nostalgia goes beyond a reverence for the underappreciated past and into an act of faith — they're so besotted with eras that ended long before they were born that they hold out hopes for the kind of careers their industries no longer have much interest in fostering.

La La Land's opening scene.

Dale Robinette / Lionsgate

Mia and Sebastian are just two more would-be artists in the crowd of strivers cluttering the 110-105 interchange in La La Land’s splendid opening scene, that long take in which a musical number erupts out of the tedium of afternoon traffic. They’re two more talented nobodies vying for parts in lousy-looking shows described as “Dangerous Minds meets The O.C.” and taking gigs with costumed ’80s cover bands to pay the rent. But their old-fashioned aspirations and touchstones leave Mia and Sebastian a half step out of sync with everyone around them, making them, La La Land intimates, more romantic and — in a way that should frankly be twee and irritating as hell — more pure.

That La La Land is not irritating as hell, that it is instead confoundingly wonderful (and, OK, a tiny bit twee), is one of those mysteries audiences can contend with months after first seeing it. Maybe it’s because the film reveals itself to be as much about the limits of nostalgia as it is an exercise in it. Damien Chazelle, whose last feature, Whiplash, was a musical of a less conventional sort, obviously has a lot in common with his characters. The 31-year-old writer and director wants to resurrect a form that has mostly faded from use, trying out the song-and-dance music the way someone might try on a vintage outfit.

But bittersweet and bubble-delicate as it might be, La La Land is too present to be a pastiche, filled with allusions to classics like Singin’ in the Rain and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, but always keeping one foot planted on the grimy LA pavement. As Mia and Sebastian, Stone and Gosling give performances that are deliberately a little imperfect. Their characters have to reckon with compromises when chasing their impossible, and then maybe not so impossible after all, ambitions. As disappointment and bitterness slowly seep into the film, the effervescence drains out, only to return in full force in the epilogue imagining an alternate history that dissipates like mist. It’s a privilege, the nostalgia Mia and Sebastian feel and ultimately use as a means of personal branding, but it’s also too shallow a solace to keep reality at bay.

Mia and Sebastian in La La Land.

Dale Robinette / Lionsgate

When La La Land wins the Oscar for Best Picture, as it seems very likely to, it will look, from afar, like a navel-gazing choice to top off the chaotic, divided misery that was 2016. What’s safer and more predictable than the movie industry’s love of movies about the movie industry? But to treat La La Land as the Oscar equivalent of a “no comment” would be to do it a disservice. It’s a bittersweet answer to a year in which nostalgia turned on us. It turned on us in minor ways, in how cynically and inauspiciously it was used to leverage sequelsBridget Jones's Baby, Zoolander 2, Independence Day: Resurgence — that no one seemed to want. And it turned on us in large, frightening ways, in the war cry of “Make America great again,” which brought with it the question of when the country was last “great,” and for whom.

The complications of nostalgia for a simpler, nattier dressed, and, incidentally, more exclusionary and oppressive time could be seen in the multiple movies set in the film industry’s past that big-name directors put out in the months before La La Land reached theaters. Each of three — Woody Allen’s Café Society, Warren Beatty's Rules Don't Apply, and the Coen brothers' Hail, Caesar! — takes great pleasure in the trappings of vintage Hollywood, and each pairs that pleasure with a different degree of acknowledgment of their time periods’ respective shittiness.

In the inert Café Society, set in a golden-toned 1930s as seen through the eyes of the Bronx-born Los Angeles transplant Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg), there’s no acknowledgment at all. The past has always had more allure than the present for Allen, and Café Society isn’t a film in which that fact is mediated by any self-awareness — there’s a tranquilizing quality to its incurious beauty. When California eventually lets Bobby, his stand-in, down, it’s not for reasons that are anything other than personal — he’s another Allen protagonist who finds the West Coast wanting.

Bobby (Jesse Eisenberg) and Vonnie (Kristen Stewart) in Café Society; Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins) in Rules Don't Apply; Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum) in Hail, Caesar!.

Amazon Studios; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Alison Cohen Rosa / Universal Pictures

More interesting but more muddled in its take on an early showbiz era is the strange, arrhythmic Rules Don’t Apply. Beatty's film is a tragedy in the form of a screwball comedy about driver Frank Forbes (Alden Ehrenreich) and aspiring actor Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins), who meet in the orbit of Howard Hughes (Beatty) in the ’50s. It’s about being at the beck and call of a gradually deteriorating man everyone’s willfully pretending is just eccentric — and in Marla’s case, it’s about being one of a collection of pretty would-be starlets being kept, corralled, and occasionally summoned like expensive pets.

Marla, who starts a forbidden romance with Frank, gets treated with great cruelty, and yet the film can’t find it in itself to be cutting — it is curiously light and sunny until its melancholy coda. Rules Don't Apply should feel like a satire about our national tendency (still going strong!) to lionize billionaire businessmen as godlike, but Beatty seems to be as fascinated by Hughes as the eventual lovers his story eclipses.

The best of the trio is the Coens’ giddy Hail, Caesar!, which is set around the same time as Rules Don’t Apply. It doesn’t just acknowledge the gap between public image and messy, sometimes ugly truth in its studio setting, it turns it into the film’s central joke. Fixer Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin) has a full-time job covering up the fact that his studio’s bathing beauty is unwed and pregnant and that its biggest star is heteroflexible.

Up-and-comers Hobie Doyle (also Alden Ehrenreich) and Carlotta Valdez (Verónica Osorio) play along with the roles of period drama stars and ethnic stereotypes assigned to them by executives. The Coens were rightfully criticized for the terrible answer they gave when asked about their film’s pervasive whiteness, but in the case of Hail, Caesar!, whiteness is part of its point. It’s a wry but cheerful portrayal of the birthplace of dreams as a manufactured, unrepresentative, barely held together lie.

Keith (John Legend) and Sebastian in La La Land.

Dale Robinette / Lionsgate

Whiteness is part of the point of La La Land as well — it is, after all, a privilege of whiteness to see yourself so easily in the stars of the studio golden age, as Mia does, and to imagine yourself among them or as carrying on in their tradition. It’s a privilege of whiteness to feel such an unabashed sense of ownership over a genre of music as fundamentally grounded in the black experience as jazz the way Sebastian does. Sebastian is gifted — it’s why Keith (John Legend), whose band is on the rise, hires him as a keyboardist, despite calling the self-appointed traditionalist a “pain in the ass” and asking him, “How are you going to save jazz if no one's listening?” Keith sees jazz as alive and adapting, whereas for Sebastian it’s frozen in the past, bound by rules about the right and wrong ways to go about it.

Keith’s right, but it’s Sebastian and Mia that the movie is about. They are passionate about their dreams, but what allows them to fulfill those fantasies is ultimately their ability to hawk nostalgia, to leverage it. That’s not the exclusive domain of whiteness, but it has certainly been a specialty of it, not just in MAGA hats but in the aesthetics of hipster Brooklyn and Silver Lake and everywhere else that can support a straight razor barbershop/bar. Mia nabs her big break, a movie shooting in Paris (Paris!), by telling a story about growing up idolizing her aunt and inheriting her desires for a bold, throwback artist’s life, turning her memories into a message more universal, a plea on behalf of dreamers. As a reward, she doesn't have to fit herself into some lesser commercial project — she becomes the film, the role being shaped around her.

Sebastian and Mia in La La Land.

Dale Robinette / Lionsgate

Sebastian, too, gets the jazz club he always longed for, and — despite his total lack of commercial sense — it’s thriving, his hardline purism having been interpreted into something that seems hip. It’s the kind of place that doesn't try to lure people off the street with its quiet retro appeal, and yet manages to anyway. It looks cool, Sebastian’s venue, and it sounds charming, Mia’s movie. Like La La Land itself, these projects are creations of a lucky and entitled collection of people for whom nostalgia for the past reads not as affectation but as authenticity. That they are so lovable in the face of their unconscious advantages speaks to the talent of the leads, to Chazelle’s measured self-awareness, and to the sincerity of the film’s joy. Or chalk it up to the magic of the movies in which La La Land so fervently believes, and which it peddles so convincingly you may not even notice what’s being sold.

Here's What People Are Excited About In Culture For 2017

Michelle Yeoh, Beyoncé, Wonder Woman, the Magnetic Fields, G.L.O.W., and a whole lot more. Mark your calendars.

Lixia Guo / BuzzFeed News

Maris Kreizman, Editorial Director, Book of the Month Club

Maris Kreizman, Editorial Director, Book of the Month Club

My favorite book that I never thought would be a TV series but more importantly never ever expected to be More Relevant Than Ever is The Handmaid's Tale. Hulu's adaptation of Margaret Atwood's dystopian masterpiece starring Elisabeth Moss airs in April. I hope it isn't merely an echo of what America looks like by then. In the meantime, "Nolite te bastardes carborundorum," or, "Don't let the bastards grind you down."

Hulu

Syreeta McFadden, writer

Syreeta McFadden, writer

Light always combats darkness. And while the political climate may augur extremely dark times to come, I resist surrendering to those forces, because we have great art and culture works on the horizon. As far as books in 2017 that I'm excited will be in the world, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah's The Explainers and The Explorers, Morgan Parker's There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé, Safia Elhilo's The January Children, Melissa Febos' Abandon Me, and George Saunders' Lincoln in the Bardo. This year, while crappy, managed to yield an abundance of great music from Jamilah Woods, Noname, Frank Ocean, Solange, Chance, Radiohead, Beyoncé, A Tribe Called Quest, Anderson Paak, Blood Orange, James Blake, and, and... that I feel really fortified entering 2017 on that end. Ah! A web series I'm really excited to see debut next year is Brown Girls, set in the South side of Chicago and centering on the friendship of two women of color. Also, the I'm Not Your Negro documentary!

Tin House Books


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The 16 Celebrity GIFs People Used To Express Themselves In 2016

As per your keyboard.

GIFs aren't just contained in Tumblr posts anymore. Thanks to GIF keyboards that you can download right onto your phone, you don't have to tell someone you want to party — you can show them with a RuPaul GIF.

That can lead to some fun insights. Tenor, the company that makes the GIF keyboard for some of the world’s most popular messaging apps — iMessage, Facebook Messenger, Kik, Twitter, Google Gboard, and the Android’s Touchpal and Kika keyboards — has compiled data on how people used celebrity GIFs to express themselves in 2016.

According to the company, people search for GIFs on their keyboards 200 million times every day. Half of the company's user base, according to CEO David McIntosh, is in North America, around a quarter is in Europe, and the remainder can be found in Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia.

Most GIFs in Tenor's database use emotions or emotional actions as a primary tag — “sad,” “smile,” “ewww” — so using a celebrity GIF usually has a tag that indicates the tone. You can, for instance, search “Steph Curry nervous” for a GIF of the basketball player biting his nails.

McIntosh told BuzzFeed News, "The world is voting with what they search for and share on how the world perceives these [celebrities]."

Here are the celebrities people turned to most in 2016 to express their emotions when words failed and only a GIF would do:

Kobe Bryant: #Smile

Kobe Bryant: #Smile

This GIF is also tagged with "really," "deal with it," and "forreal."

Tenor / Via tenor.co

LeBron James: #Eww

LeBron James: #Eww

Gross.

Tenor / Via tenor.co

RuPaul: #Party

RuPaul: #Party

San Diego searches for this tag more than any other city every night of the week, according to Tenor.

Tenor / Via tenor.co


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32 Of The Female Creators Who Made Great TV In 2016

We’re at peak TV, but instances of women creating their own shows are still rare. For women of color, it’s even rarer. So let’s celebrate those who did the damn thing.

Issa Rae

Issa Rae

Who she is: Creator, executive producer, and star of the HBO series Insecure. Prior to that, she was known for her web series Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl.

What she gave us in 2016: A much-anticipated and critically acclaimed TV debut that is artfully invested in the everyday comedy and drama of adulthood. And the promise of more to come, with her comedic anthology series Minimum Wage in the works.

Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images / HBO

Michaela Coel

Michaela Coel

Who she is: Creator, composer, lead actor, and sole writer of Chewing Gum, which aired on E4 in 2015 but came to Netflix for the US in 2016.

What she gave us in 2016: Stateside access to a series built on fun raunch and the electric presence of Coel's own star power. Not to mention production on the eagerly awaited second season, because we already need more.

John Phillips / Getty Images / E4 / Netflix

Rebecca Sugar

Rebecca Sugar

Who she is: The mastermind behind Cartoon Network's Steven Universe, working as the executive producer and storyboard artist as well as writing the story for the series and most of its music.

What she gave us in 2016: Another thoroughly beloved season of Steven Universe's particular brand of deeply felt humanity, which was especially needed in a year as bleak as 2016.

Paul Zimmerman / Getty Images / Cartoon Network

Ava DuVernay

Ava DuVernay

Who she is: Creator, executive producer, and director of Queen Sugar on OWN. You may also know her as the director of Selma, Netflix's 13th, and the upcoming film A Wrinkle in Time.

What she gave us in 2016: A beautifully realized series that employed a crew of all-women directors for its first season. DuVernay also gave the world a devastatingly necessary look at the prison system.

Mike Windle / Getty Images / OWN


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Kids Are Sending Santa Letters At Elf On The Shelf Headquarters And It's Freaking Adorable

More than 120,000 letters each year!

Everyone knows you can write a letter to Santa at the North Pole, but you might not know you can also send a letter to Santa at Elf on the Shelf headquarters — and get a response!

Everyone knows you can write a letter to Santa at the North Pole, but you might not know you can also send a letter to Santa at Elf on the Shelf headquarters — and get a response!

Elf on the Shelf receives and responds to more than 120,000 letters every holiday season.

elfontheshelf.com

The quickest way to get a response is by submitting a letter online, but lots of kids send letters in the old fashioned way too.

The quickest way to get a response is by submitting a letter online, but lots of kids send letters in the old fashioned way too.

If you'd like to mail Santa a letter you can send it to the address below, which is an official outpost for the North Pole, don't cha know?

The Elf on the Shelf®
3350 Riverwood Parkway SE, Ste 300
Atlanta, Georgia 30339

elfontheshelf.com

So what are kids writing? BuzzFeed spoke to a Scout Elf at E.O.T.S. headquarters who shared some of their favorite quotes from this year's letters:

So what are kids writing? BuzzFeed spoke to a Scout Elf at E.O.T.S. headquarters who shared some of their favorite quotes from this year's letters:

elfontheshelf.com

"I was just wondering if you liked the chicken nuggets we left you last year, and if you would like more this year."

"I was just wondering if you liked the chicken nuggets we left you last year, and if you would like more this year."

Flickr: flyingsaab / Via Creative Commons


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